Previous Winners of the AMMCS Kolmogorov-Wiener Prize for Young Researchers:
2015

The winner of the AMMCS Kolmogorov-Wiener Prize was

  • Benjamin Adcock (Simon Fraser University) for his interdisciplinary work in mathematics centered on sampling theory and compressed sensing.

He was awarded at the 2015 AMMCS-CAIMS Congress, June 7 – 12, 2015.

Award citation:

Benjamin Adcock received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2010. After his graduation, he received NSERC and PIMS Postdoctoral Fellowships and was carrying his research at Simon Fraser University. In 2012 he joined Purdue University as an Assistant Professor. Since August 2014 he is on the faculty of mathematics at Simon Fraser University. Dr. Adcock’s research interests include applied and computational harmonic analysis, sampling theory, compressed sensing, as well as approximation theory and numerical analysis. He made original significant contributions to sampling theory and compressed sensing which have potential applications in the areas ranging from medical imaging to geophysical signal processing. At the time of the award, he has published twenty journal publications, most of which are in the top tier journals of his field. Dr. Adcock’s work bridges the gap between theory and practice by developing and applying highly innovative mathematical tools.

2013

The winner of the AMMCS Kolmogorov-Wiener Prize was

  • James S. M. Anderson (Beijing University) for his work on the development of computational methods for mathematical models of many-body quantum mechanics.

He was awarded at the AMMCS-2013 International Interdisciplinary Conference, August 26 – 30, 2013.

Award citation:

James Anderson received his PhD from McMaster University in 2010. After his graduation, he was working at the University of Tokyo as a recipient of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Postdoctoral Fellowship. Since January 2013 he has been working at Beijin University, sponsored by his NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Anderson's research interests cover several areas of applied mathematics, quantum physics, and theoretical chemistry, with a major focus on electronic and nuclear many-body problems. His most recent contributions are on reduced density matrix theory. He gave many presentations at international meetings and developed an impressive network of collaborators in Japan, Canada, China, the United States, Chile, and Europe. At the time of the award, he has published twelve journal papers in high quality international journals.

2011

The winner of the AMMCS Kolmogorov-Wiener Prize was

  • Dr. Hassanpour (University of Waterloo) for his work on theory and applications of nonlinear vibrations.

He was awarded at the AMMCS-2011 International Interdisciplinary Conference, July 25 – 29, 2011.

Award citation:

Pezhman Hassanpour received his PhD from the University of Toronto in 2008. After his graduation, Dr. Hassanpour joined the University of Waterloo where he held an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship. His research contributions include mathematical and numerical analysis of micro-electro-mechanical and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems such as sensors and resonators. Dr. Hassanpour has been instrumental in analyzing such systems with deterministic and stochastic mathematical models in energy harvesting applications, biomedicine, health and food industries. His current research interests include also the development of nanotechnology-enabled optical biosensors, nonlinear systems dynamics and control. At the time of the award he has published five papers in high quality international journals and six conference proceedings.